Author Message

<  Music  ~  Top Ten

PostPosted: June 24th, 2006, 10:52 am
User avatarAdminPosts: 612Location: Los AngelesJoined: November 19th, 2005, 10:22 am
I was recently asked to list ten of my personal favorite albums, with a brief note on each for a proposed book compiling such a list from various musicians.
I chose the ones that made a particular and lasting impact.
Since I've no idea if, let alone when the book will see publication, I thought I'd post the list here, as it's the kind of thing I get asked fairly frequently.



____________________________



I'm sure that I'm like most other people in that the albums that have left the most impression and that have ben most influential are the ones that I discovered during that initial period of discovering new music in one's youth when so much was new and waiting to be discovered.
My passion for music remains the same as it did then, and the quest continuos to find that recording that brings back that sensation of hearing a great album for the first time.

Having to restrict my choices to ten for the purpose of this exercise, the ones that particularly stand out for me are:


The Clash : The Clash. (CBS 1977)

(The original British release, not the American version with a different tracks)
Along with the Sex Pistols' "Bollocks", the album that spawned a thousand imitators (dam them). Angry, fresh, and above all vital. While there are many good arguments as to why this isn't the best Clash album, it's the one that does it for me. A real breath of fresh air when it came out, and those who weren't around at the time often seem to forget just how different to everything else this was.
Saw The Clash live numerous times in the late 70's and for a time they really were "The only band that mattered". Forget the imitators, this is the only punk album you need.


Throbbing Gristle : 2nd Annual Report. (Industrial Records 1977)

Like most exceptional releases, I first heard of this album via word-of-mouth and it proved difficult to track down due to the original limited run of 785. It was most definitely worth the effort. This was about as different an album as I'd heard, in a period when I was actively seeking out and listening too a lot of experimental and "new" electronic music. most of it too pretentious for it's own good.
Brutal, powerful, unnerving and majestic. It blurred the line between music and noise and began a new language of it's own.
This was a statement cried out aloud, and a gauntlet thrown at the feet of those who claimed they broke barriers with punk. It's a gauntlet that hardly anybody has been willing to pick up.
Beginning here, TG influenced a generation of musicians who went on to influence others.
(Don't even get me started on the diluted and rather meaningless so-called "industrial" music that came latter).
Chris & Cosey of TG became (and remain) two of my closest friends and were instrumental in my starting down my own musical path when they suggested that I "do it myself". So blame them not me.


Agustus Pablo : King Tubby Meets Rockers Uptown. (Clocktower & Yard International 1977)

The space between the notes defines dub. Exquisite placement of sound and texture. The album to play people who have never heard real dub (and yes, there are such people !) If they don't "get" it, well, they can just fuck off.
This album made me aware of the concept of using the studio as an instrument, which was a major influence (as a "professional non-musician") on the way I work.
Also recommended is Jacob Miller's "Who Says Jah No Dead" album from who's vocal cuts that most of these dubs derive.

Joe Gibbs and the Professionals : African Dub Chapter III. (Joe Gibbs 1978)

Largely the work of engineer Errol Thompson (who also engineered "King Tubby Meets Rockers Uptown"). Dub goes over the edge with sound effects that literally include the kitchen sink, and is all the better for it. All held together by some classic root rhythms.
Chapter IV is equally good but omitted here to keep within the 10 album limit.


Kraftwerk : The Man Machine. (EMI 1978)

An album that I bought on the day of release. On first impression, pure in it's simplicity, yet more detailed listening rewards with the perfect placement of sound and texture. While oft imitated, nobody comes even close to Kraftwerk. This album was almost omitted, but only to make room for their 2005 live album Minimum Maximum, but The Man Machine wins for being such an inspiration at the time. You should still run out and buy Minimum Maximum too by the way.


Joy Division : Unknown Pleasures. (Factory Records 1979)

The band that went so far over the edge that they never came back, and this album mapped out that journey right from the beginning..
Despairs, remorse, regret and the center of that city at night. They sound as if they really mean it, and of course, as testified by Ian Curtis' suicide that marked the end of the band after two albums (of which this is the first), he most certainly did.
I bought this album the day after (unexpectedly) seeing them live when they supported The Buzzcoks on a tour to support this album. Still after all those years the best and most electrifying show I've seen, and this album is only a glimpse of that performance, but better than no glimpse at all.


Little Axe : Slow Fuse (Wired Recordings 1996)

The best Tackead derived album, here in the guise of the second release by guitarist Skip McDonald's project Little Axe.
As good as the first album "The House That Wolf Built" is, this is where all the ingredients (tight grooves, dub and blues) come together for a perfect blend, masterfully captured by Adrian Sherwood's production, which retains the playfulness and touch of chaos that makes his mixes so good, but within a more restrained and mature content.
A perfect blend of that Tackhead/On-U sound mixed with the tonality and richness of delta blues, with grooves as only Le Blanc, Wimbush and McDonald can fashion.
Try and search out the long deleted Australian limited edition release if you can, as it's extra disc of otherwise unavailable versions and remixes is well worth the effort.
It's a real shame that Moby's tepid attempts at fusing blues gathered more attention and unfortunately success than did Little Axe, as the latter do it so much better and did it first.


Martin Denny : Exotica 90. (Insideout, Japan 1990)

Recorded in Tokyo and Hawaii in 1990, and including versions of some of his hit's from the 1950's, including some with added vocals (!). While I was familiar with and enjoyed Denny's material, it wasn't until being exposed to this album in 1990 during vacations to San Francisco and Los Angeles that I really grew to love it. Perfect for playing while driving around California in an open-top car. Purists will probably prefer the original recordings, but this album has a soft spot for me.


TV Victor : TV Victor. (Tresor 2000)

A double CD release, of which only the first disc containing the 70 minute track "Agai" is essential and the reason why the album is included here.
What Jazz would sound like if basic channel/Rhythm and Sound chose to apply their methodology to it, which isn't surprising as "Agai" features obvious contributions by Mauirizio Von Oswald of basic channel fame.
A long, sublime track that very gradually chances and develops over it's length. Drifting in and out of one's consciousness, mesmerizing and sublime.
The rhythm is clearly lifted from The Peddler's "On a Clear Day You Can see Forever" from 1968 .


Bohren and der Club of Gore : Black Earth (Wonder 2002)

David Lynch meets Miles Davies at 3 am in a smoked-filled cellar one dark night in 1958.
Jazz so slow it hardly moves, midnight black and cold. Add Mellotron and the result is perfection.



____________________________

Albums that I would have included if I wasn't restricted to ten would be:

Various Artists : Headz (MoWax)
Vangelis : Blade Runner - Esper Edition (2CD Bootleg)
Tangerine Dream : Rubycon


Last edited by B on November 20th, 2009, 6:48 am, edited 1 time in total.

Offline Profile WWW
PostPosted: June 29th, 2006, 12:38 am
Posts: 47Location: CanadaJoined: December 3rd, 2005, 11:04 am
well... here's my top 15. It's true so many albums are "only" favorites because of their impact in early life. There may be better and more influential albums out there, but these are the ones that upon first listen, was something completely new and as such remained the benchmark for comparison.

Sorry to cheat, but i made this list before and it's on this site. Sorry to those who don't want to waste a click of the mouse button :p

http://rateyourmusic.com/list/PassionIm ... f_all_time


Offline Profile WWW
PostPosted: June 29th, 2006, 7:28 pm
User avatarAdminPosts: 612Location: Los AngelesJoined: November 19th, 2005, 10:22 am
The object of the original exercise was to choose ten, and only ten albums that you would chose if you could only have/listen too ten, along with a brief explanation or review of each.

I think it might make for an interesting thread if anybody contributing did just that rather than taking the thread into different areas (you're welcome to do so in separate threads).

So if you're going to post in this thread, just list your own top ten, and don't go over ten, which might make it too easy.


Offline Profile WWW
PostPosted: July 14th, 2006, 10:04 am
User avatarPosts: 2Location: Upside down and inside outJoined: July 14th, 2006, 9:54 am
My top 10 albums

TPWTBSH
Magnificent Void - Steve Roach
Fissures - Robert Rich & Alio Die
Stalker - Rich & Lustmord
Deep Breakfast - Ray Lynch
Novus Magnificat - Constance Demby
Rachmaninov's Isle of the Dead
Gustov Holst's The Planets
Ambient Expanse - Roach/O'Hearn/Obmana/Bacchus/Unis
New Romantics - Hearts of Space Collection



_________________
Just another schlub tryin' to get by...
Offline Profile
PostPosted: July 14th, 2006, 10:32 am
User avatarPosts: 2Location: Upside down and inside outJoined: July 14th, 2006, 9:54 am
GimmeABreak wrote:
My top 10 albums (explanation included now)

TPWTBSH
Put on the head phones, close my eyes and do the separation exercises from Castenada's books

Magnificent Void - Steve Roach
My first experience with dark ambient. A girl never forgets her first time.

Fissures - Robert Rich & Alio Die
OK, I didn't forget the second one, either.

Stalker - Rich & Lustmord
Or the third.

Deep Breakfast - Ray Lynch
Your Feeling Shoulders has a deep loin-stirring rumble that can't be beat.

Novus Magnificat - Constance Demby
Sacred space music at its best.

Rachmaninov's Isle of the Dead
I keep waiting for this to appear in a movie when a man on horseback chases a carriage full of vampyres.

Gustov Holst's The Planets
There's something about Jupiter that still brings a lump to my throat, 35 years after the first hearing.

Ambient Expanse - Roach/O'Hearn/Obmana/Bacchus/Unis
A very nice selection of slightly paler dark ambient. Good background for writing.

New Romantics - Hearts of Space Collection
My favorite of the Hearts of Space pieces. New age classical, most of it rather melancholy.



_________________
Just another schlub tryin' to get by...
Offline Profile
PostPosted: July 25th, 2006, 3:20 pm
Posts: 11Location: SoCalJoined: November 28th, 2005, 1:42 am
Nice call on Constance Demby. I guess some of the sounds on Novus are a bit dated now, but her great sense of composition still shines through.

For my own list: it's quite hard for me to narrow my favorites down to just 10, but here are among the albums from various genres which have been most influential:

Tool - Ænima
Believe it or not, this is actually the first album I ever owned. I had never had much interest in music until I bought this (based mostly on just the cool cover). Dark, groovy, and a lyrical feast for the analytically-minded (such as myself).

Steve Roach - The Magnificent Void
A friend in high school cryptically recommended Mr. Roach to me, offering no clue as to the style of music he created. I arrived at the local store and was overwhelmed by the selection. I choose this album, generally at random, and it was love at first listen. My first ambient recording.

Michael Stearns - The Lost World
Another earlier ambient find. Great tones. Superb use of field recordings. Utterly entrancing and evocative.

Lustmord - Zoetrope
My first Lustmord recording (yeah, yeah...I know). While most dark ambient seemed content to just conjure up a creepy atmosphere, here was music that went after you! It was not just ominous, but dangerous! I was hooked.

Vas - In the Garden of Souls
Sounds pulled from all corners of the world, but blended into a new beast entirely. Melodic percussion, wordless vocals, and plaintive cello. Sometimes erotic, sometimes mournful, sometimes celebratory; always engaging.

Elend - The Umbersun
I can't even remember where or how I found these guys. A cacophanous, yet often beautiful journey portraying the seizure and reclamation of Heaven and the fall and resurrection of Lucifer. A feast for the scholar as well as the listener.

Greg Ellis - Rhythmtonics
A seven-CD box set by the drummer for Vas containing--with the rare exception of a flute or conch shell--nothing but percussion. Amazing rhythmscapes and tones. As a drummer, I've found this incredibly inspirational. It greatly expanded my view of what could be done with just unaltered (no loops, edits, or processing) percussion.

16 Horsepower - Folklore
This is what all folk music should be. Edgy, brooding, full of religious angst (thankfully, not as preachy as their other releases). William Faulkner set to music.

Diamanda Galas - The Divine Punishment & Saint of the Pit
Confrontational, powerful, uncompromising music with a very important point. I'd never heard anything quite like this before. Beautiful but deeply unsettling. And that voice...!

Loreena McKennitt - The Mask and the Mirror
I'll probably get some flak for this one, but I don't care. It's a damn beautiful album. Wonderfully diverse.



_________________
...and we yet fail, though not for want
of will or wherewithal.
Intention is the blade, perforce,
on which intentions fall.
Offline Profile
PostPosted: September 15th, 2006, 1:27 pm
Posts: 219Location: TexasJoined: April 30th, 2006, 9:26 am
I know its been awhile since this thread started but its hard to think of top ten albums! I just randomly thought of a list this afternoon and decided I'd post it and see if people really disagree or if some of you actually like some of this stuff too! (other than the obvious lustmord references in the list)

These are the top ten albums (in no particular order) that have made me stop and listen to them over and over and impressed me enough to be inspiried to work further on my own music...

1. M83 - Dead Cities, Red Seas, & Lost Ghosts. You just don't come across something as unique as this too often in the "brand new" section of a record store. It is fresh, but has a great thickness to its air that brings back thoughts of early electronica and the purity behind it. There is a sense of unkowning but also warmth within the sounds on this album. They would drastically change their sound for the next release (partially due to losing one half of the group) and I don't feel they'll ever be able to recreate anything as powerful as this "shoegazer" experience.

2. Lustmord - The Place Where the Black Stars Hang. For some reason this album has always stuck with me as the greatest Lustmord album; it has a powerful darkness to it that is just unexplainable. I can hit replay on "aldebaran of the hyades" a hundred times and never get tired of it. The journey that track takes you on is worth this album being in the top ten alone, but the entire album is quite a journey altogether.

3. Brian Eno - Ambient I: Music for Airports. This is the first "ambient" recording I ever owned and still to this day cannot go a month without listening to it on record. I bought the CD a few years ago, but never really use it. I am very loyal to the record copy of it I bought when I was about 13. The cracks and pops add to the feeling of this record, and the heat burn it received over the years gives it a detuned feel in parts of the recording that the CD just cannot give me. It is somethin special to put on during a rainy day.

4. Kraftwerk - its a tie between Computer World & Autobahn. It is always so hard to say what Kraftwerk album is better than another because they all have such varying special qualities to them. One thing that is easily understood about every release of theirs is that they pushed recording and instrument boundaries...(up until they started remixing their own work!). I love Computer World because I grew up listening to it and its the only "techno" album I've ever been able to share with my sisters and they both love it! (Recently I DJed my little sister's sweet 16 bday party and she actually, along with some of her friends, requested I play pocket calculator). Computer World was just a fun, but really great electronic pop album. Autobahn I tend to like because I love that fat, thick edgy sound of early electronics. They emit a warmth even when trying to have a colder, darker edge. Plus who wouldn't like Kometenmelodie I & II? Classic pieces !

5. Jean-Michel Jarre - Oxygene 1-6. I don't care much for the guy or his current work, but this album along with Equinoxe just threw me for a loop as a teenager. I had heard all kinds of strange, electronic, and interesting noises by my teens due to the 80s and early 90s entertainment shift but I still had never heard the sounds of true space until I got Oxygene. I remember hearing it on an ambient radio show during the summer right before I started high school and heard just one track but was absolutely blown away by this space travel adventure for the mind. I ran right out and bought the CD, and a few years later finally found it on vinyl. Alot of people are quick to pass this guy up because by music standards today he is one of those new age kind of flakes, but at this point in the 70s..Oxygene was an unheard of masterpiece, and still blows me away when I hear it today.

6. e.s. posthumus - Unearthed. Not many people have heard of this album, or if they have they know it strictly by the ads it was used in (tracks from this album were used in movie promotions for Unfaithful, Spider-Man, & Minority Report). If you can ignore all that mainstream use - the album is quite beautiful. It is a very passionate, classic album of a sensual battle between good and evil. There are tracks that can be very seductive, especially the final track called "isfahan" but there are also tracks like "tikal" that just attack you from the time it starts till it finally closes. I just ask that you not listen to any kind of remixes done for these tracks - as they are just absolutely horrible.

7. Enigma - Le Roi Est Mort, Vive Le Roi! This album was the first Enigma album that sent me a musical voyage I guess. The first two were amazing albums to me, and I listened to them over and over but for some reason they never grabbed ahold of me the way Le Roi Est Mort did. It has a dark feeling to it, its colder. The first Enigma album, which had "Sadeness" on it was a dark album in the sense of sin and sex and lust, but with Est Mort you feel cold, alone, empty, and I enjoyed that heavily. The recording and sound quality, as always with Enigma, is simply amazing.

8. Aphex Twin - I Care Because You Do. Such a great IDM album. I don't think RDJ has come out with something since that has rivaled the simple beauty of this CD. It is so accessible for just about anyone...which is rare for RDJ work. Typically he is brazenly hard, over the top, and his sense of humor not everyone gets. But this was a sensitive side to his work for once - a rare gem. It seems at times he took the more intimate ambient work and meshed it into some of the rhythmic sensibility he displays from time to time. To me, this is the best RDJ album ever (and yes I know most people disagree with me but who cares!).

9. Gavin Bryars - The Sinking of The Titanic. A beautifully written piece that is unmatched in its avant garde, natural ambience and relaxed environment that it mysteriously creates out of such chaos. I can listen to Bryars work all day and never get tired of it, but to me this is his stand-out piece.

10. David Bowie - a tie between Heathen & Lodger. Lodger is easily understood I think as one of his greatest works. It is so much fun to listen to, but at other times it doesn't have to be fun at all. If you let it - the darker side will come out of the shadows of these tracks and really frighten you...but not enough to turn it off, but rather create an enigma within the style that makes you want to replay the entire work over again. Stand out tracks like "african night flight" & "dj" are easily well remembered and, to me, inspirational pieces of music. For Heathen...I think it was just great to see a real album come out of Bowie after all those years of crap. He surprised alot of people with this record, including me. I found it thick, heavy, but easily listenable. The lyrics were catchy along with the tunes, but it wasn't a simple pop album by any means. Unlike Bowie himself, there was definitely meat on the bones of this record. Especially when you hear tracks like "i would be your slave", "everyone says hi", & "sunday."

Runner-up albums that at least deserve mentioning:
Tangerine Dream - Zeit.
Lustmord/Robert Rich - Stalker.
John Carpenter - Halloween Soundtrack.
Hans Zimmer - Gladiator Sountrack.


Offline Profile WWW YIM
PostPosted: September 15th, 2006, 4:01 pm
Posts: 11Location: SoCalJoined: November 28th, 2005, 1:42 am
shipwreckage wrote:
6. e.s. posthumus - Unearthed. Not many people have heard of this album, or if they have they know it strictly by the ads it was used in (tracks from this album were used in movie promotions for Unfaithful, Spider-Man, & Minority Report). If you can ignore all that mainstream use - the album is quite beautiful. It is a very passionate, classic album of a sensual battle between good and evil. There are tracks that can be very seductive, especially the final track called "isfahan" but there are also tracks like "tikal" that just attack you from the time it starts till it finally closes. I just ask that you not listen to any kind of remixes done for these tracks - as they are just absolutely horrible.


I've heard great things about this album but haven't yet been able to track it down. How did you find it?



_________________
...and we yet fail, though not for want
of will or wherewithal.
Intention is the blade, perforce,
on which intentions fall.
Offline Profile
PostPosted: September 15th, 2006, 7:42 pm
Posts: 219Location: TexasJoined: April 30th, 2006, 9:26 am
It is DEFINITELY worth seeking out. I believe you can still order it from their website, http://www.esposthumus.com/ .

I ran across it a few years ago whenever Unfaithful was out - I really liked the movie, and loved the music. So I researched the soundtrack, bought it - noticed the track they used for the commercials had not appeared on the CD so I did a little deeper digging and came across Posthumus and just ordered the CD. I was definitely surprised to find out how amazing it really was...

ryan


Offline Profile WWW YIM
PostPosted: September 15th, 2006, 10:48 pm
Posts: 11Location: SoCalJoined: November 28th, 2005, 1:42 am
shipwreckage wrote:
It is DEFINITELY worth seeking out. I believe you can still order it from their website, http://www.esposthumus.com/ .

I ran across it a few years ago whenever Unfaithful was out - I really liked the movie, and loved the music. So I researched the soundtrack, bought it - noticed the track they used for the commercials had not appeared on the CD so I did a little deeper digging and came across Posthumus and just ordered the CD. I was definitely surprised to find out how amazing it really was...

ryan


Thanks; just ordered it. As much as I love ambient, I'm still a sucker for nice dramatic themes. Interesting to hear they did the intro music for Cold Case. That 30 seconds or so is pretty much the only reason I still own a TV.

I rather liked the Unfaithful score as well. Haven't seen the movie, though.

*Edit: it seems like the trailer music for the new-ish King Arthur movie (which I loved--the music, that is) is a reworked version of Menouthis.



_________________
...and we yet fail, though not for want
of will or wherewithal.
Intention is the blade, perforce,
on which intentions fall.
Offline Profile
PostPosted: September 16th, 2006, 5:59 am
Posts: 219Location: TexasJoined: April 30th, 2006, 9:26 am
Quote:
Thanks; just ordered it. As much as I love ambient, I'm still a sucker for nice dramatic themes. Interesting to hear they did the intro music for Cold Case. That 30 seconds or so is pretty much the only reason I still own a TV.


I was not aware of that either - Cold Case as in the investigative/documentary show on A&E?

Quote:
I rather liked the Unfaithful score as well. Haven't seen the movie, though.


Unfaithful the score is beautiful - Kazmerick or something like that, i forget how you spell the composer but its really great small piano movements. The movie was great - probably because I think Diane Lane is freakin' hot in it buuuut oh well!

Quote:
*Edit: it seems like the trailer music for the new-ish King Arthur movie (which I loved--the music, that is) is a reworked version of Menouthis.



I don't think I've seen the king arthur trailer - is that the film that came out for rent a few months ago? If so, I think I watched the final half of it a couple of times on Showtime or HBO or something but never caught all of it. Sadly I don't think I can recall any of the music from it.

ryan


Offline Profile WWW YIM
PostPosted: September 27th, 2006, 10:33 am
Posts: 28Location: AZJoined: November 26th, 2005, 9:46 am
Neu! - Neu2
Definitely worthy of the hype it gets. This album was way ahead of it's time. This is the album all the rockstars name drop as an influence as if the mere mention of it will wash away their complete lack of artistic merit. Buy it, worship it.

Kraftwerk - Autobahn
If you don’t like this album you don’t like electronic music. Autobahn is just my favorite, but they're all cooler than anything in the history of mankind. Kraftwerk=God

Klaus Schulze - Timewind
I think it was first EP of KS's to make it to the states. This one is from back in his early analog days. I think Klaus Schulze proved how beautiful electronic music could actually be.

Tangerine Dream - Phaedra
One of the more popular TG albums, this one is drony, experimental, and just too freaking cool. Whenever I listen to it I feel like I'm floating into the astral plane, or some hippy crap like that.

Kodo - The best of Kodo Vol II
Bunch of little Japanese guys beating the hell out of big Japanese drums. Absolute musical perfection. Recordings don’t really do these guys justice. Seeing them live left me thinking "I didnt know human beings could actually do that!"

Einsturzende Neubauten - Strategies Against Architecture
Early Neubauten is brutal raw noisy destruction, like setting off an M80 in your mouth. With this album they were lobbing hand grenades at popular music.

Einsturzende Neubauten - Silence is Sexy
The other end of the spectrum for Neubauten. Here I think the band reached a climax in their development. Still with all the metallic banging but musical, even charming.

Bad Sector - Ampos
Definitely under appreciated. Unique powerful and emotional this guy creates drones on his own custom build digital analog synth hybrids. I'm going to have to resort to my 80's childhood slang and call this album "Badical!!!"

Diamanda Galas - Malediction and Prayer
Just Diamanda and a piano. I think this is DG's best album (that I've heard anyway) because here she strips away all the uber-goth flare and lets her voice and talent stand on it's own. This woman scares me and I like it.

Dissecting Table - Human Breeding
Speed Metal meets the Terminator soundtrack on crack. This guy has been lobbing the most aggresive music ever heard at us from Japan for decades. There's nothing quite like it. I list Human Breeding as a favorite because it was my introduction to DT waaay back in my teen years.


Offline Profile WWW
PostPosted: October 31st, 2006, 1:29 am
Posts: 11Location: Chicago, ILJoined: October 31st, 2006, 1:10 am
1. Tool - Lateralus
My all time favorite album, I don't think that anything will ever top it either. This album opened up my eyes to many different artists both visual and audio. Plus, it is also what prompted me to study a bit of the esoteric and occult.

2. ISIS - Panopticon
Probably the most refined and experimental ISIS album out. I can just put this album on and listen to it from beginning to end.

3. Sleepytime Gorilla Museum - Of Natural History
One of the strangest albums and bands out there. If you ever want to listen to some of the most different music out there, I highly recommend this album.

4. Lustmord - Heresy
I probably don't need to go into reasons why, but this is probably my favorite Lustmord album. Some of the darkest sounds that I have ever heard are on this album and its also what prompted me to study sound design at college.

5. Zombi - Surface to Air
Really interesting combination of drums and synth that makes for some really cool sci-fi / zombie film prog-rock.

6. Converge - Jane Doe
Converge is some of the most interesting hardcore music out there. Jane Doe is probably their most refined album that I've listened to, but No Heroes may bump it once it gets enough plays.

7. Lustmord + The Melvins - Pigs of the Roman Empire
This album was the first time that I ever heard Lustmord, plus its the Melvins and Adam Jones as well. What's not to love?

8. Sunn O))) - Black One
Pure evil. That sums up the album very nicely actually. A different sort of ambience from Lustmord, but still extremely good. They actually locked the vocalist in a coffin to record the vocals on one of the songs.

9. The Doors - The Doors
My favorite Doors album. It has almost all of my favorite Doors songs (most notably Alabama Song and Break on Through). I just plain fucking love The Doors.

10. Kyuss - Welcome to Sky Valley
The epitome of desert rock. Songs like Gardenia, Space Cadet and Demon Cleaner just make a high that much better. This was Kyuss's masterpiece, without a doubt.


Offline Profile
PostPosted: November 7th, 2006, 2:55 pm
Posts: 7Joined: December 22nd, 2005, 8:10 pm
Most of you folks listen to such eclectic stuff it's hard to compete, some exceptional descriptions of albums though. Here's my attempt:

Agalloch-The Mantle: This album was a consummation of metal(folk metal) for me, I really have put aside all over heavier music since I began listening to this album and band in general. Agalloch's ability to mix in a philosophy with trance-like metal lacks a pretension which most of the metal I know is full of.

Autechre-Tri Repetae: This album for me defines IDM as it's finest. The ambient additions are amazing, and the actual album is perfect. The song Bbronchusevenmx24 contains one of the most interesting sounds I have ever heard.

Bad Religion-All Ages: It's a compilation I know, punk is dead. Okay, okay next album. If I had to choose one album by these guys I would have to go with Recipe for Hate.

Boards of Canada-Music Has the Right to Children: This album seems to be infinite in it's ability to bring emotions to the forefront of the mind. What it lacks in coherence it has in depth, there is no shortage of reminiscing material here. The best music to listen to when high or hungover imo.

Can-Tago Mago: The best effort this band put out over there short career with Damo Suzuki. The whole album is one big dreamscape for me, it really envelops my mind and allows me to wander through myself. I have yet to fully listen to Future Days, which I own, but I plan on spending some time one day with it.

Gza/Genius-Liquid Swords: I decide to choose only one rap album, and this album is undoubtedly something which still amazes me by any music standard. The whole package was something that no other rapper in my opinion ever toppled. Honorable rap mentions: Gang Starr-Moment of Truth, Ghostace Killah-Ironman, Mobb Deep-The Infamous, Lost Boyz-Legal Drug Money, De La Soul- Stakes is High.

GodSpeed You! Black Emporer-Yanqui U.X.O.-I know post rock is something which everyone feels will die out and such, but this album is for me a timeless album. It exposes the feelings which I have been hiding for a long time, a soundtrack for life for my most fervent moments.

Mogwai-Young Team: I am going to pick Young Team here but there is no Mogwai album that captures for me there whole sound. They seem to morph steadily in different directions on each effort, sometimes focusing on a certain mutation and sometimes ready to expand. I read somewhere that a certain critic thought these guys to be the best band around, and although I don't believe that I definitely find it hard to disagree.

Porcupine Tree-Stupid Dream: At the moment this is my favorite album so I decided to list it. This band really seems to be keeping a certain style of Prog alive, an innocent style, something which stays with true rock music roots.

Tool-Undertow: It is impossible for me to choose any true favorite album by Tool, but Undertow for me is a special album. It is the album which came straight from the mind of the band, they were not heavily influenced yet by all the occult(hidden I know) and arcane things which they have delved into recently. The raw energy of the album is something I can relate to at my age, and seeing clips of this album live are probably the coolest things I have ever seen.


Offline Profile
PostPosted: November 8th, 2006, 6:46 am
Posts: 16Joined: January 24th, 2006, 1:30 pm
In no particular order

Time Machines by Coil.
Quite likely the album that's had the most profound impact on me. I have to be careful with this one because I tend to obsess over it.

Filosofem by Burzum.
I'm still not sure whether it's the sheer amount of ambient distortion playing tricks on my ears, or if all those trippy patterns I hear in the background are actually there. I usually listen to Hvis Lyset Tar Oss before this one - they complement each other well, but I'm trying to limit myself to one album per artist here.

Borderlands by Tactile.
It's a shame that the best Tactile album is so hard, and often expensive, to obtain. One of the best mood albums I've ever heard. Like Time Machines, I've had a few unhealthy obsessions with this one - total brain massage.

Volume One by Organum.
Brilliant early to mid-period Organum. It's the combination of intricate patterns and exceptional clarity of sound that initially draws me into Organum's music.... then I'm dumbstruck by the overwhelming beauty of it all. I agree with the reviewer who wrote that Organum at once conveys a sense of the Ancient and also the distant future.

Soundtracks for the Blind by Swans.
Everything I could ask for in a Swans album.

Moments by Lull.
Another brain melter. I wish Mick Harris would release more Lull material.

Spiral Insana and A Missin Sense by Nurse With Wound.
Spiral INsana is the more ecclectic of the two and I always come across something I either missed before or forgot was there. However A issing Sense is just plain gorgeous: The title track contains (what is to me) one of the creepiest moments in music: that disco section that fades in during the latter half of the song. And Swansong leaves me breathless!

Decay Product by Various Artists.
Basic Channel/Chain Reaction sure released some excellent music, but I listen to this one the most. I hardly listen to techno but I listen to this stuff all the time.

Black Ships Ate the Sky by Current 93.
The best album they've recorded yet! Hearing some of the songs live, nearly a year in advance of the album's release was a real treat.

Ydin by Mika Vainio.
Similar to some of Thomas Koner's work but unmistakably Mika Vainio.

If this was a Top 20 list there's be albums by Cocteau Twins, Virgin Prunes, Lustmord, and, yup, Nirvana!


Offline Profile

Display posts from previous:  Sort by:

All times are UTC - 8 hours
Page 1 of 3
41 posts
Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests
Search for:
Post new topic  Reply to topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum